Collection of Bee Coloring Pages

The bees belong to the Hymenoptera family. On this page, you will find a collection of bee coloring pages.

You can choose the pictures you love then color them as you like. The following coloring pictures are free. So, let’s take a look and have fun.

Best Bee Coloring Pages Free

Bee Coloring Pages For Adults
Bee Coloring Pages For Adults
Coloring Pages Bee
Coloring Pages Bee
Charmy Bee Coloring Pages
Charmy Bee Coloring Pages
Bee Movie Coloring Pages
Bee Movie Coloring Pages
Bee Coloring Pages
Bee Coloring Pages
Bee Coloring Pages Printable
Bee Coloring Pages Printable

If a buzzing insect is bothering you at lunchtime, it’s probably not a bee. Bees will leave you alone at lunch unless they are attracted by a jar of honey or want to protect their hive.

Bees rarely sting because the sting is fatal: because of its harpoon, the stinger remains stuck, causing its death.

The bee does not have a “wasp size”, that is to say, that its thorax is not very different from its abdomen. Hairy, it measures about twelve millimeters. Its abdomen is lined with black bands, and its legs have pollen baskets.

Although many species are solitary, the best known of them, the honey bee, is a social creature that lives in a colony with a rigid hierarchy.

Each hive has only one laying female who rules over many workers and a few males. The primary role of the latter is to fertilize the young queens when they have reached maturity and are ready to leave the hive to establish their colony.

Cute Bee Coloring Pages
Cute Bee Coloring Pages
Free Bee Coloring Pages
Free Bee Coloring Pages
Free Printable Bee Coloring Pages
Free Printable Bee Coloring Pages
Honey Bee Coloring Pages For Kids
Honey Bee Coloring Pages For Kids
Honey Bee Coloring Pages
Honey Bee Coloring Pages
Lol Queen Bee Coloring Pages
Lol Queen Bee Coloring Pages
Printable Bee Coloring Pages
Printable Bee Coloring Pages

She enlarges and cleans the hive, as well as maintaining its temperature and protecting it. The worker secretes royal jelly to feed the queens and forages for water, pollen, propolis, honeydew, or nectar, which she turns into honey.

She also makes wax from which she builds the characteristic parallel-comb hive.

When a new queen leaves the nest, she does so with a swarm that can include several thousand individuals searching for the ideal place to build a hive. And the “ideal” position for them is not necessarily suitable for you.

Even though they are about the same size as the bee, although not as stocky, wasps are not very hairy, and their abdomen is easily distinguished from their thorax. Its yellow is brighter, and its black stripes, more marked.

Social wasps build their nests in a paste that looks like old paper or cardboard, which they make by mixing their saliva with wood fiber.

Although it can be cleverly hidden, sometimes even under the ground, the wasp nest can also be apparent and installed in a busy place, for example, near the garbage cans or the picnic table.

The social structure of a wasp colony is not so different from that of a bee colony. After hibernating, the queen starts building the wasp nest and lays eggs for the workers.

Only at the end of the summer, some males are produced. They mate with the new queens in a mating flight and die after mating, while the fertilized queens find shelter for the winter to repeat the cycle in the spring.

Wasps can sting repeatedly and will not hesitate to do so if they feel attacked, for example, if we get too close to their nest or try to chase them off our plate.

They sometimes attack without apparent provocation. Their venom can cause severe allergic reactions. If a string is accompanied by dizziness, shortness of breath, or excessive swelling, go to the hospital immediately.

Even though they are not foragers of the same caliber as bees, this does not mean that they are not helpful: by consuming harmful insects like caterpillars, they maintain the balance of ecosystems.